Schadenfreude
by Chris Kelso

Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

Schadenfruede Front CoverSchadenfreude
Enter a mind full of transcendental drugs, doomed punks, voyeuristic puppets and omnipotent intergalactic prisons in Chris Kelso’s debut short fiction collection.

Visit the author’s spotlight here or find out about his novella, The Best Years of Your Life.

Now at Amazon
Buy the book at Lulu

Buy the book from Central


Delivery destination

 

Acclaim for this Book

‘Chris Kelso is a writer of wide and varied obsessions. InSchadenfreude he shares all of them. Like all possessed minds, his is glued together with recurring themes, and they unify this volume in strange ways. Most forms of transportation in Kelso’s world comprise metal peanut shells. And anything tubular, say a transportation artery or a sewer is presented as “ropy,” like the blood vessels into which drugs are constantly being injected. He populates Hell with pop icons (for which favour much gratitude is due). And he has performed the heretofore seemingly impossible task of coming up with interesting and original names for punk bands and their songs. This collection is just the right amount of raunchy, and is guaranteed to uplift the heart of today’s most discerningly jaded nihilist’
Tom Bradley, author of Hemorrhaging Slave of an Obese Eunuch

Schadenfreude is more than a short story collection; it’s a way of life’
Stewart Home, author of Red London

‘Chris Kelso is the one your mother warned you about. He is a sick, sick man—bereft of cure and heaped with symptom. His words will taint you irrevocably. Your eyes will want to gargle after reading just one of his stories. His book is unique—and that’s a good thing.’
—Steve Vernon, author of Nothing To Lose

Sparky, modern, avant-garde but accessible, Chris Kelso’s book is reminiscent of the most successful literary experimentation of the 60s and 70s, the sort of work that was published in the later New Worlds, but it’s also thoroughly contemporary, intimately engaged with modern life as it is right now. Kelso steams with talent and dark wit and his blend of anarchy with precision is refreshing, inspiring and utterly entertaining . . .’
—Rhys Hughes, author of Mister Gum

‘This emerging journeyman of the macabre has wormed his way into my grey-matter and continues to seep noxious ichor. I feel like I must devour him. Every little bit of him.’
Adam Lowe, author of Troglodyte Rose

‘Chris Kelso is the finger inside of your least favourite hole giving you your most favourite sensation; Schadenfreude is the frothy evidence left behind.’
—Christy Leigh Stewart, author of Terminally Beautiful 

‘Choke down a handful of magic mushrooms and hop inside a rocket ship trip to futuristic settings filled with pop culture, strange creatures and all manner of sexual deviance. The mundane becomes the bizarre, the standard evolves into the alien, and penises and vaginas are rarely what they seem. Buckle up. Shadenfruede is indeed pleasure derived from the misfortunes of others.’
—Richard Thomas, author of Transubstantiate 

‘Take Mr Kelso’s front-loaded disclaimer of dour grey moroseness with the boulder of salt it deserves. This is a jittering nightmare collection of images and events that will startle and delight you at every turn. Revolting and eerily charming, Schadenfreude will linger in your mind long after you put it down.’
Deb Hoagauthor of Queer and Loathing on the Yellow-Brick Road 

Schadenfreude proves, once and for all, that Chris Kelso is NOT a mannequin.’
—D. Harlan Wilson, author of Peckinpah

‘The stories in Schadenfreude are like non-Euclidean geometry: mysterious, unique and wrapped in an aura of magic and mysticism. Kelso’s prose is lean and tough and the impact these stories have on the reader prove there’s no need for gimmicks when the power of weirdness is effectively wielded.’
—Gabino Iglesias, Horror-Talk

‘Chris Kelso is a writer of almost intimidating intelligence, wit, and imagination. On every page there is evidence of a great mind at work. Just when you’re wondering if there are actually still writers out there who still feel and live their ideas out on the page, I come across a writer like Kelso, and suddenly the future feels a lot more optimistic. I look forward to seeing what he’s capable of in the longer, novel form: it’s a tantalising prospect. To wear his influences as smartly as he does – one calls to mind Burroughs, and Trocchi’s more verbose offerings – whilst remaining uniquely himself, in a writer as young as he is, is a very encouraging sign: one of maturity that belies his youth. I look forward to reading more from him in the near future.’
Andrew Raymond Drennan, author of The Immaculate Heart

‘Schadenfreude is more than a short story collection; it’s a way of life’
Stewart Home, author of Red London

‘Chris Kelso is the one your mother warned you about. He is a sick, sick man—bereft of cure and heaped with symptom. His words will taint you irrevocably. Your eyes will want to gargle after reading just one of his stories. His book is unique—and that’s a good thing.’
Steve Vernon, author of Nothing to Lose

‘Schadenfreude proves, once and for all, that Chris Kelso is NOT a mannequin.’
D. Harlan Wilson, author of Peckinpah

‘Chris Kelso is the finger inside of your least favourite hole giving you your most favourite sensation; Schadenfreude is the frothy evidence left behind.’
Christy Leigh Stewart, author of Terminally Beautiful

‘A bewildering manuscript written in an unknown tongue and cheek. Full of pleats and petards but does not mention halibuts in any context. So don’t just read it upside down; read it upside down and inside out.’
Justynn Tyme; The don doo-dad of dada

‘I hella dug it! Chris Kelso’s Schadenfreude is dirty, dark, and fun. This collection is a dismal delight, peppered with humor as black as plague and infused with gripping horror, for fans of macabre fiction.’
Jonathan Moon, author of Heinous

‘Schadenfreude functions as a pathology museum never intended for those seeking to educate themselves about what may go wrong in fiction–or the world at large–but was instead constructed for the voyeur who escaped from your basement, still bound with razorwire, desperate for the ultimate degradation.’
John Edward Lawson, author of SuiPsalms

Be Sociable, Share!
Filed in Books on May 9, 2013